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WCS Journal August 5 – August 11

WCS Journal August 5-6, 1888

WCS Journal August 5-6, 1888

August 5, 1888,  Sunday
Very sultry –  Mr. Hubbard finished two  excellent services to two very large audiences  –  all his admirers and noisy “malcontents” were out –  I was invited to Rueletts to dinner but as Mr. H. was here did not accept –   Mother declined for me.  Mrs. Ruelett wrote her a note – 

August 6, 1888,  Monday
Rainy all day –  Mother has a dress maker Miss Martin –  Arthur Warner  was down all day –  Attended a directors  meeting.  The City Bank has decided to take Whitman’s dry goods store  –  Cor  Race & Dwight Sts.  for their new bank building –  Went horseback riding with Joe –  it was awful muddy –  Mother has a  Century plant which bloomed tonight and all the neighbors came in to see it –  it was a great success –  Kitten took a photo of it – 

WCS Journal Augst 07-08, 1888

WCS Journal Augst 07-08, 1888

August 7, 1888,  Tuesday
Returned to N.Y. on the 7:20 and am staying at Bath Beach as usual –  I bought today one of the most intensely interesting  books I ever read and I am going to forward it to Father tonight as it is just his style & he  had been asking about it constantly –  “The American Jew”  Fischer is off on his vacation so I have to do a little extra work.

WCS Journal August 9-10, 1888

WCS Journal August 9-10, 1888

August 8, 1888,  Wednesday
Came up from Bath at 6:34 and was at the store at 7:40 –  Very  disagreeable.  Hot &  moist –  Nothing new –  Philo White who was a salesman for us when Peck was managing things here died.

August 9, 1888,  Thursday
Beautiful but very warm –  Came up on the 7:09 boat –  James G. Blaine has been expected [here] from Europe and his admirers have been waiting to give him a big reception but the steamer –  City of N.Y. is making her first trip and is over due –  so the parade arranged for tonight comes
off without Blaine – 

[From Wikipedia: James Gillespie Blaine (January 31, 1830 – January 27, 1893) was an American Republican politician who served as United States Representative, Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, U.S. Senator from Maine, and twice as Secretary of State. He was nominated for President in 1884, but was narrowly defeated by Democrat Grover Cleveland. Blaine was one of the late 19th century’s leading Republicans and champion of the moderate reformist faction of the party known as the “Half-Breeds.”

WCS Journal August 10, 1888

WCS Journal August 10, 1888

August 10, 1888,  Friday
Came up this A.M. at 7:09 –  Blair around this A.M. –  Maxwell the Englishman who murdered his friend Preller in the Southern Hotel,  St. Louis, was hung.  Everything has been done to save him both here and in England –  it is certainly a very complicated case – 

[Newspaper clipping
The crime for which Hugh M. Brooks, alias Maxwell, paid the penalty of the law this morning was the murder of his friend, Charles Arthur Preller, in the Southern Hotel, Sunday, April 6, 1885. The acquaintance between Maxwell, as he is best known, and Preller was formed in Liverpool, England, in 1883. Preller was a refined gentleman of means. The friends separated in Boston, and in the latter part of

Hugh M. Brooks (aka Walter H. Lennox Maxwell)

Hugh M. Brooks (aka Walter H. Lennox Maxwell)

March, 1885, Maxwell arrived a the Southern Hotel in St. Louis, and was assigned to Room 144. A few days later Preller arrived, and though occupying different rooms they spent their waking hours together. Sunday morning, April 6, they were seen together in Room 144. W.K. Ross, traveling salesman for an Eastern hardware house, occupied the room adjoining 144 that Sunday afternoon. e heard water running, and heard repeated groans, Maxwell had formed the acquaintance of a druggist J.W. Fernow. Twice that day he purchased chloroform, the second time excited and would not brook delay, saying he had spilled the first. That night Maxwell appeared in the dining room without his friend. The next morning a porter was sent to Room 144 to take down Maxwell’s trunks. There were two trunks and goods were scattered about the room, and as Maxwell was not there the porter went away. Maxwell made a number of purchases at various places, spending money freely. He bought a ticket for San Francisco, for which he paid $116. Monday night he left St. Louis on the St. Louis and San Francisco west-bound train.

For several days prior to Tuesday, April 14, chambermaids at the Southern Hotel had detected an unpleasant odor coming from Room 144. On that day the odor became so strong that the room was entered and trunks, which some connected with the stench, were taken down stairs. The terrible smell drove the porters away from the larger trunk when they attempted to open it. A trunk maker was called and broke the lock, and the cover sprang up followed by the knees of a man. Crammed into the trunk was a putrid body, shrunken and distorted, not a feature recognizable. Not until after the body had been taken to the Morgue and several days of treatment given could it e decided whetehr it was the body of Maxwell or Preller. Finally, however, the remains were identified as those of the latter. It became easy matter to trace Maxwell, and when ___iney anchored in Auckland he was placed under arrest]

WCS Journal August 11, 1888

WCS Journal August 11, 1888

August 11, 1888,  Saturday
Beautiful day – Cool & very pleasant – Came up from Bath Beach on the 7:09 train –  Went home on the 11 o’clock train as Aldrich of the C & J Trading Co. was going through to Boston on that train and wished me to go for company –  Belle &  [   ] played tennis after which she & I took a long horseback ride. Gen. Phil Sheridan was buried at Washington today.

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